Homeschooling in Indiana
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Getting Started Homeschooling in Indiana
There is so much information about homeschooling that it can seem overwhelming. We've gathered information to help you make your homeschooling decision and to inform you about laws and other legal issues. Here you'll find research and statistics that support the notion that homeschooling provides specific advantages to children and families. And we'll help you take the first steps on the road of your own homeschooling adventure.

 
Why Homeschool?
  The first step to homeschooling is making your decision to home educate your child. It is important to become informed and knowledgeable about some of the main concerns you may have. Explore these areas of our website to learn more about the initial decision to homeschool.

Where to Begin
  You've decided to homeschool your child! But what comes first? For many parents, knowing where to begin in the homeschooling process can be confusing. Although there seems to be so much information available, it may be hard to get your questions answered. We've put together some resources to start you on your journey, giving you the information and motivation you need to successfully begin to homeschool in Indiana.

Legal/Homeschool Laws
  Laws that regulate home education vary from state to state. It is important to understand the legal requirements in your state and to be aware of legislative and other legal issues that affect homeschoolers in your community. We've compiled resources that will help you become informed. Although homeschooling is legal in all 50 states, and the vast majority of homeschoolers face no problems, you may find that you need legal assistance at some point in your homeschooling career. We've compiled a list of resources to help you find the support you need. And if you'd like to become more involved in working towards homeschooling freedoms, we discuss some of the issues facing homeschoolers that we hope you find compelling.

History of Homeschooling in America
  How did homeschooling start? When did it become legal? Who were the key players in making homeschooling the social movement it is today? The story of the history of homeschooling in the United States is a compelling tale of dedication, innovative ideas, and personal conviction and sacrifice. We have put together a history of this educational and social phenomenon, hoping it will inspire you to learn from the early and more recent pioneers of home education in America.


Featured Articles & Links Back to Top
the Pros and Cons of Homeschooling
Isabel Shaw
Homeschooling is becoming more popular every day, with a growth rate of 7 to 15 percent per year. There are about two million children currently learning at home. Homeschooled kids do well on standardized tests, are welcome at colleges and universities, and as adults, have a reputation for being self-directed learners and reliable employees. To help other parents who are considering homeschooling, here is a new list of pros and cons.
Thoughts on Socialization from a Homeschool Graduate
Heather Greutman
You would think that in a world full of homeschool graduates, many of whom get into top colleges, win national spelling bees, and score way higher on all national and state tests that people would realize that the socialization question really is obsolete now days. But because we spend all day with mom (or dad) and siblings, instead of in a school room with 1 teacher to 25+ children we suddenly aren’t socialized! This homeschool graduate shares her experiences with her "lack" of socialization.
Homeschool Confession: I don't want my boys to be "Socialized"
Crystal Brothers
Socialization is all about conforming--to societal demands, attitudes, styles, values, beliefs, and ways of dressing, acting, and thinking. Socialization’s very aim is to break us from any and all individuality, so that we can better integrate into the system–even if it’s a broken system. But by not conforming to this dynamic--not teaching them to conform--you can teach them to be in the world in a more natural way.
Why I Homeschool
Amy Thornton-Kelly
There is a lot of pressure to encourage children to be independent when the school bus arrives, but often our children are too young to force separation. Many children can discover their independence in their own time.
A Homeschooler's History of Homeschooling - Part 6: 1995-1997
Cheryl Seelhoff
This is the final installment of Cheryl Seelhoff's series on the history of homeschooling in America.


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