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African American Homeschooling

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National Organizations Back to Top
African American Homeschool Network
The African-American home school movement is growing; however there is a lack of on-line networks. This FB Community is a prelude to the collaborative effort to create a membership site. Its main function will be to support, encourage, and promote African American Homeschool families. Including curriculum selection and co-op group start up in your local communities.
Afrocentric Homeschoolers Association (AHA) Yahoo Group
A discussion group for pro-Black African and/or African Diasporan, Black homeschoolers, unschoolers, deschoolers, home-based educators everywhere. It is also open to non-homeschoolers and non-Blacks who are trying to teach their children about Blacks.
Black Alliance for Educational Options (BAEO)
Black Alliance for Educational Options (BAEO) exists to educate and inform the general public about parental choice initiatives on the local and national level; educate Black families about the numerous educational options available; create, promote and support efforts to empower Black parents to exercise choice in determining how their children are educated; and educate and inform the general public about efforts to reduce or limit educational options available to parents.
Black Homeschoolers' Network
Black Homeschoolers' Network is intended to facilitate a network among African American homeschoolers across the country. Here you will also find a message board for general communication as well as an email pal listing for homeschooled kids.
National African-American Homeschoolers Alliance (NAAHA)
The National African-American Homeschoolers Alliance was born out of a desire to unite African-American homeschoolers nationally. Launched in January 2003, NAAHA is the only nonsectarian organization for African-American home schooling families. The primary objective of NAAHA is to disseminate home schooling information relevant to African-American homeschoolers or to anyone home schooling African-American children. NAAHA's fundamental mission is to consistently provide the latest and the best home school information and resources for members and online guests to enjoy--from home schooling books and curricula to new African-American support groups and organizations. In addition to being an information clearinghouse, NAAHA also provides free educational advisory help from educational professionals and from those with a degreed knowledge of a particular subject.
National Black Home Educators Resource Association (NBHERA)
The National Black Home Educators Resource Association (NBHERA) is a resource network founded by Eric and Joyce Burges in July 2000. This association encourages, supports, and offers fellowship to families who are exploring benefits of home education. NBHERA was created to serve the African American community by providing assistance with information about getting started homeschool, networking/connecting veteran families with new families, recommending resources such as books, music, films, speaking information, curriculum, etc. NBHERA’s mission endeavors to empower parents to educate their children for excellence.
The Liberated Minds Black Homeschool and Education Association
Their purpose is to be a trustworthy, conscientious, and dependable resource in the "true" education of youth and families. By providing consistent support, guidance, and current relevant information, they are committed to assist in all academic subjects and critical life areas that cultivate children to be young dedicated scholars, critical thinkers, builders, and problem solvers; addressing the specific needs of Black/Afrikan people.


Articles Back to Top
African-American Home Schooling - Why Black Children Benefit From Home Schooling
Jennifer James
With the educational landscape becoming more diverse in America, black parents are looking for better ways in which to teach their children. One of the new educational alternatives and the only one thus far exhibiting parity between the races is home schooling. Though many blacks are embarking on home schooling as a new educational choice, many don't fully know why home education tends to work for black children. This article will piece together clues that account for black children's affinity for learning at home.
Beyond Statistics: A Real Look At Black Homeschoolers
Jennifer James
In the past couple of years the news has been inundated with national, international and local articles reporting the dramatic rise of homeschooling in the African-American community. Although we often get statistics about Black homeschoolers, we rarely get a glimpse of real families. This article takes you into the lives of Black homeschooling families who are taking their children's education into their own hands.
Creating African-American Home School Support Groups
Jennifer James
In order for home schooling to be successful in the African-American community, it is imperative that local and state support groups and organizations be formed. There are several ways that African-American homeschoolers can reach out and create support groups either on the local or state level. This article gives tips and ideas for starting a homeschool support group.
Homeschooling Grows in the Black Community
Michael Smith
The best research on homeschooling indicates the total number of children who are homeschooled is 1.5 to 2 million, and that number is growing by 10 to 15 percent per year. But not everyone recognizes the academic and social success of homeschoolers and some criticize the movement as being white and elitist. While it's true that the large majority of homeschool children are white, the number of black homeschoolers is growing rapidly. Brian Ray, president of the National Home Education Research Institute, estimates that there are 30,000 to 50,000 black children being homeschooled today. Others estimate that black homeschoolers make up 5 percent of the total homeschool population. Most importantly black homeschool movement is growing at a faster rate than the general homeschool population.
Homeschooling--It's a Growing Trend Among Blacks
African-Americans are joining the national home schooling community at larger and larger numbers every year. Following a nationwide trend, educating children at home is becoming a popular option for Black Americans as private school costs rise and the reputation of public schools grows worse. Read about the current movement of African-American homeschoolers.
New Movement: African-American Homeschooling
Jennifer James
While families have been homeschooling for nearly thirty years in the United States, it is only recently that African-American families have seen the proven potential of educating their children at home. In a time of perpetual academic underachievement, the ever-stagnant achievement gap and unfettered, unequal access to quality schools and resources, African-American families are taking a dramatic approach to the educational future of their children by adopting a collective and renewed stance on family-led learning.
Poor Education Prognosis
Walter Williams
Drs. Abigail and Stephan Thernstrom's new book "No Excuses: Closing the Racial Gap in Learning" shows that the government education whites receive is nothing to write home about, but for blacks, it's no less than a disgraceful disaster.
The African-American March in Homeschooling
Raymond Moore
Raymond Moore shares his insight into the movement of African American homeschooling. Includes a wonderful retelling of his experience in a Texas court room when Helen Jackson, the plaintiff in a class action lawsuit, made her compelling case for educating her own children.
The Choice To Homeschool: A Quick Primer For Black Families
Jennifer James
When black families look to homeschool there are a lot of questions to take into consideration. Here is a quick primer to get you started.
The Growing Black Homeschool Movement
HSLDA
Anecdotal evidence seems to indicate that homeschooling is growing in the black community. Mike Smith of the Home School Legal Defense Association discusses this with Joyce Burges, co-founder of the National Black Home Educators Resource Association.
The House the Burgeses Built: One Family’s Neighborhood-Wide Approach to Home Education
Greg Beato
In July 2000, Louisiana residents Joyce and Eric Burges created the National Black Home Educators Resource Association, a nonprofit organization that provides advice on curriculum materials, pairs new families with veteran home educators, and produces an annual symposium. The Burgeses’ goal is to encourage other African-American families to become more involved in their children’s education. This article tells their personal story and how they have impacted the community in which they live.
The New Pioneers: Black Homeschoolers
HSLDA
A new wave of pioneers is sweeping onto the home schooling trail. After decades of promises that the public school "system" holds the key to success, some African-American families are finding, like those of other ethnicities, that an increasingly centralized system and social decay are fast dissolving the bonds of their culture and families. And many have found a way to reconnect and restore those bonds by home schooling—an educational path so old and overgrown that it's considered radical and cutting edge.
The Rise of Home Schooling Among African-Americans
Significant growth in black families’ participation in home schooling is beginning to show up on the radar screens of researchers. The National Center for Education Statistics computed African-Americans as 9.9 percent of the 850,000 children the federal agency figured were being home-schooled nationally in 1999. Veteran home-schooling researcher Brian Ray figures blacks are currently about 5 percent of the 1.6 million to 2 million home-schooled children but he agrees that black home schooling is growing rapidly.
Unschooling from an African-American Perspective
S. Courtney Walton
A look at unschooling as a philosophy of life from an African-American perspective.
Web Presence for African-American Homeschoolers
Jennifer James
Creating a web presence of African-American home school support groups will do much to organize and network families across the country and internationally. This article the basics for creating a personal home schooling website or site for a home school support group or organization.

Support Groups Back to Top
African American Homeschooler
This is a Yahoo group email list for African American parent(s) who homeschool their children.
African American Homeschoolers
This group is for African American parents (or parents of African American children) who are homeschooling their children. It is also for parents looking to supplement their children's education with home study.
African American Unschoolers (AfAmUnschool) Email Group
African American Unschoolers email group is for African-American homeschoolers who use the whole world as their child(ren)'s classroom.
African-American Single Parent Homeschoolers
African-American Single Parent Homeschoolers is a discussion group designed to lend support and resources to parents who are home schooling alone.
African-American Unschool Teens
African-American Teens who unschool/homeschool: Come hear how others live exciting, creative lives outside of traditional schooling.
Afrocentric Homeschoolers Association Email Group
Afrocentric Homeschoolers Association Email Group is a discussion group for pro-Black African and/or African Diasporan, Black homeschoolers, unschoolers, deschoolers, and home-based educators everywhere. It is also open to non-homeschoolers and non-Blacks who are trying to teach their children about Blacks. It was founded as a resource for Black homeschoolers, Blacks in Canada, the U.S., Caribbean, and elsewhere, including the African Canadian, African American, African Caribbean, Black European, African, and Black Canadian.
Black Homeschoolers Club
This is a great social networking site for black homeschoolers. It is designed to help share educational goals and curriculum plans as well as connect with other families.
Families of Color Utilizing Home Schooling (FOCUHS)
This list is for Christian families of color who've opted to home educate their children. They exist to offer support, fellowship and to share resources with other African American and bi-racial Christian homeschooling families.
Mocha Moms
Mocha Moms, Inc. is a support group for mothers of color who have chosen not to work full-time outside of the home in order to devote more time to their families and communities. Mocha Moms serves as an advocate for those mothers and encourages the spirit of community activism within its membership.
New Rising Homeschool Network
Are you working fulltime and feeling as though you and your children have been left out of the homeschool loop? Are you a single parent concerned you might not be able to meet the demands of homeschooling? Does your child have special needs? Dell's Place has established a network for working moms, single parents, and the rest of us who struggle to pull it all together. The purpose of this network is for support and encouragement, but it's also to offer real solutions from other parents who struggle with the same issues.

Links Back to Top
African Centered Curriculum for Homeschool
KuumbaHomeschool
This youtube video talks about an African-centered curriculum based on the texts African American History: A Journey to Liberation by Dr. Molefi Kete Asante and Classical Africa.
African Centered Resources
KuumbaHomeschool
Great youtube video discussing various African-centered resources for homeschoolers.
African Centered Resources Part 2
KuumbaHomeschool
Part two of a youtube video discussing various African-centered resources for homeschoolers.
African-American Unschooling
African-American Unschooling is the Internet resource for African-American homeschoolers with an Africentric approach to learning all the time. African-American Unschoolers encounter math, science, reading, writing, art and history in the real world because real living leads to real learning.
Blacks are the largest segment rising in homeschooling
Shakaama
Black parents are now turning to homeschooling their children. After realizing that public schools are failing black children on a massive scale, black parents are turning to homeschooling. This video discusses these issues.
Large family finds a way to homeschool
This youtube video gives a look into a large successful homeschooling family. This African-American family of seven children has had all children go to college, starting while still in high school.
Mocha Moms
Mocha Moms, Inc. is a support group for mothers of color who have chosen not to work full-time outside of the home in order to devote more time to their families and communities. Mocha Moms serves as an advocate for those mothers and encourages the spirit of community activism within its membership.
Tips for Cultural Studies in Homeschooling
Here are some tips on how to incorporate cultural studies into your homeschool. This can be used if you are trying to include or highlight your own heritage/ background or if you want to study another culture that is not your own. One of the blessings of home education is that you have the opportunity to study various different world cultures without limitations. You can go beyond the one or two holidays or cultural activities that they may or may not do in the public school system. You can incorporate your culture into every aspect of your curriculum or just highlight some of the major bullet points of your culture. Either way I think these tips give a great starting point to enriching your curriculum program.

Resources Back to Top
4 My Kids Records
4 My Kids Records is committed to producing quality educational and entertainment products that will ignite a child’s excitement to learn. Every catchy song, dance-floor groove, memorable story, colorful illustration and fun-filled animation is created with a timeless heart.
Brown Sugar & Spice Books
Brown Sugar & Spice Books carries African-American children's books, multicultural books, and black history books for adults and children.
Footsteps Magazine
Footsteps Magazine is a magazine designed for young people, their parents, and other individuals interested in discovering the scope, substance, and many often unheralded facts of African American heritage. It is an excellent classroom resource for teachers, a valuable research tool for students, and an important vehicle for bringing this rich heritage to people of all backgrounds.

News Back to Top
More African-Americans turn to home schooling
The Cinncinati Enquirer
More African-American families have embraced home schooling in recent years, making black people one of the fastest-growing segments of home schoolers. Like charter schools and voucher programs, the home-schooling movement is fueled by parents fed up with large class sizes, low academic achievement, peer pressures and the high cost of private education.
More Blacks Turn to Home-Schooling
Washington Times
An increasing number of black families nationwide are choosing to home-school their children as they become fed up with what they call the country's "inadequate" public school system. Blacks now make up nearly 5 percent of the estimated 1.7 million children who were home-schooled last year, according to estimates by the National HomeEducators Research Institute in Oregon, a non-profit organization devoted to research on home-based education.


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